Jetline’s leap of faith to make books cheaper for students

Great news! A progressive Paperight-affiliated copy shop chain is taking big steps to make books more affordable in the country’s urban centres by charging only 50c per double-sided A4 page for books and other documents printed through Paperight.

Gauteng-based chain Jetline, which has 43 branches throughout South Africa, is looking to address urban dwellers’ problems with accessing textbooks that they require for tertiary or vocational studies.

More than most other places in the country, South Africa’s city centres are teeming with books. Almost all of them, however, are locked up in commercial bookstores, out of the reach and budget of those who need them most.

More than most other places in the country, South Africa’s city centres are teeming with books. Almost all of them, however, are locked up in commercial bookstores, out of the reach and budget of those who need them most.

Jetline has recently signed up with Paperight to help allieviate this problem.

Jetline hopes to address the issue of unaffordable books by slashing prices for students printing books or other documents through Paperight. Students can now print their choice of hundreds of books and other documents on demand for only 50c per double-sided A4 page – half the price of the average photocopy – at any of their stores.

Understanding the current crises in distribution of educational material throughout South Africa, Jetline hopes to prove that money can be made by simply making books cheaper for urban students.

“The offshoot of this is that Jetline will achieve the high volume of printing jobs needed to allow them to offer such low printing charges to their customers,” says Arthur Attwell, Paperight’s CEO and Founder.

“It’s a cycle that benefits everyone in the long term, but it requires a small leap of faith to kickstart it. By doing this, Jetline is vividly illustrating their determination to address South Africa’s problems in effectively distributing educational material.”

A university staple such as The Great Gatsby can cost R80-R120 in a commercial bookstore. Through Jetline, a Paperight edition of the same book can cost as little as R40.

Jetline is also reducing delivery costs of printed Paperight documents for customers in remote areas, meaning that students don’t have to live in the city to take advantage of Jetline’s price cuts.

To find a list of all of Jetline’s outlets, click here.

2 thoughts on “Jetline’s leap of faith to make books cheaper for students”

Leave a Reply